New Air Quality Standards

March 7, 1997 • Volume 7, Issue 9
Should U.S. pollution regulations be stricter?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

Smoke billows from an electric generating plant in Pennsylvania  (Photo Credit: Robert Visser, Greenpeace)
Smoke billows from an electric generating plant in Pennsylvania  (Photo Credit: Robert Visser, Greenpeace)

The proposed tightening of federal air quality regulations has sparked bitter debate between businesses and public-health professionals as well as entire regions of the country. At issue are the maximum levels of smog and soot permitted under the 1990 Clean Air Act. Affected industries say the stricter regulations would impose intolerable financial burdens while providing negligible health benefits. Environmentalists and many health professionals say enforcing stricter air standards would save lives at relatively low cost and improve everyone's quality of life. The Environmental Protection Agency must make its final decision on the new standards this summer. Meanwhile, disagreement over the need for new standards is developing into one of the most acrimonious environmental debates in decades.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Air Pollution
Nov. 13, 2015  Air Pollution and Climate Change
Nov. 14, 2003  Air Pollution Conflict
Jan. 26, 2001  Global Warming Treaty
Mar. 07, 1997  New Air Quality Standards
Nov. 01, 1996  Global Warming
Oct. 27, 1995  Indoor Air Pollution
Apr. 03, 1992  Ozone Depletion
Mar. 08, 1991  Acid Rain: New Approach to Old Problem
Nov. 27, 1987  Air Pollution Countdown
Apr. 10, 1987  Ozone Mystery
Mar. 07, 1986  Acid Rain
Oct. 16, 1981  Wood Fuel's Developing Market
Nov. 21, 1980  Air Pollution Control: Progress and Prospects
Jun. 20, 1980  Acid Rain
Mar. 19, 1976  Ozone Controversy
Apr. 26, 1967  Air Pollution: Rising Threat
Jan. 08, 1964  Air Contamination
Jan. 14, 1959  Cleaner Air
Apr. 06, 1955  Poisoned Air
Aug. 26, 1949  Air Pollution
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Air Pollution
Atmospheric Sciences
Infectious Diseases