Assisting Refugees

February 7, 1997 • Volume 7, Issue 5
Do current aid policies add to the problems?
By David Masci

Introduction

A physician from the relief group Doctors Without Borders threats a sick baby on the road from Goma,Zaire, to Gisenyi, Rwanda, last November  (Photo Credit: © Remco Bohle)
A physician from the relief group Doctors Without Borders threats a sick baby on the road from Goma,Zaire, to Gisenyi, Rwanda, last November  (Photo Credit: © Remco Bohle)

The refugee crisis in Zaire and Rwandahas once again focused world attention on displaced people. Affecting more than 5 million people,the crisis has forced refugee-aid groups, governments and others to reassess the way aid to refugees is now rendered. For the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees and other humanitarian relief organizations,the situation raises fundamental questions about aiding refugees: Can efforts to help actually make matters worse? And how can tragedies like the one in Central Africa be prevented or at least mitigated in the future? For the United States and other developed nations, the crisis has reopened the debate over whether using soldiers to assist humanitarian relief efforts is appropriate, and whether dramatic media coverage of crises can lead to bad policy decisions.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Refugees and Asylum
Aug. 16, 2017  Refugees
Jul. 31, 2015  European Migration Crisis
Mar. 2009  Aiding Refugees
Jul. 09, 1999  Global Refugee Crisis
Feb. 07, 1997  Assisting Refugees
Oct. 27, 1989  The Politics of American Refugee Policy
May 30, 1980  Refugee Policy
Aug. 26, 1977  Indochinese Refugees
Apr. 11, 1962  Cuban Refugees
Feb. 25, 1959  Doctrine of Asylum
Jan. 08, 1958  Palestine Arab Refugees
Oct. 12, 1954  Assimilation of Refugees
May 03, 1950  Right of Asylum
Nov. 27, 1946  Immigration of Refugees
Apr. 14, 1938  Resettlement of Refugees
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Global Issues
Humanitarian Assistance
Immigration and Naturalization