Global Warming

November 1, 1996 • Volume 6, Issue 41
Are limits on greenhouse gas emissions needed?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the greenhouse effect by the Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius. Thanks to sophisticated computers and satellites, scientists today know more about how burning fossil fuels and other industrial activities release carbon dioxide and other gases that trap solar heat in the Earth's atmosphere. Predictions about the increasing pace of global warming caused by human activity have so alarmed policy-makers that efforts are under way to draw up an international treaty - due to be signed in Kyoto, Japan, in 1997 - to curb greenhouse gas emissions. These efforts have sparked controversy in the United States, where some scientists and industry representatives dispute the accuracy of future warming predictions and oppose limits on energy consumption.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Air Pollution
Nov. 13, 2015  Air Pollution and Climate Change
Nov. 14, 2003  Air Pollution Conflict
Jan. 26, 2001  Global Warming Treaty
Mar. 07, 1997  New Air Quality Standards
Nov. 01, 1996  Global Warming
Oct. 27, 1995  Indoor Air Pollution
Apr. 03, 1992  Ozone Depletion
Mar. 08, 1991  Acid Rain: New Approach to Old Problem
Nov. 27, 1987  Air Pollution Countdown
Apr. 10, 1987  Ozone Mystery
Mar. 07, 1986  Acid Rain
Oct. 16, 1981  Wood Fuel's Developing Market
Nov. 21, 1980  Air Pollution Control: Progress and Prospects
Jun. 20, 1980  Acid Rain
Mar. 19, 1976  Ozone Controversy
Apr. 26, 1967  Air Pollution: Rising Threat
Jan. 08, 1964  Air Contamination
Jan. 14, 1959  Cleaner Air
Apr. 06, 1955  Poisoned Air
Aug. 26, 1949  Air Pollution
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Air Pollution
Atmospheric Sciences