Treating Addiction

January 6, 1995 • Volume 5, Issue 1
Should government try a new approach?
By Sarah Glazer

Introduction

Although casual use of drugs has been declining in the United States, there has been little change among heavy users of heroin and crack cocaine. Hard-core drug abusers typically are at the bottom of the social ladder, where drug-treatment programs have had the poorest track record. As a result, the killings, disease and abandonment of children spawned by drugs continue at a shocking pace. Advocates for expanded drug treatment argue that new programs will more than pay for themselves in reduced crime, improved health and fewer broken families. But skeptics oppose throwing more taxpayers' money at treatment, saying it's not clear which, if any, approaches really work. Meanwhile, new studies say government over-regulation limits the availability of effective anti-addiction drugs.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Drug Abuse and Trafficking
Jun. 29, 2017  Drug Abuse
Oct. 07, 2016  Opioid Crisis
Jul. 19, 2016  Drug Abuse
May 02, 2014  Treating Addiction
Jun. 03, 2011  Teen Drug Use
Jun. 12, 2009  Legalizing Marijuana Updated
Dec. 12, 2008  Mexico's Drug War
Feb. 09, 2007  Combating Addiction
Jun. 02, 2006  War on Drugs
Jul. 15, 2005  Methamphetamine
Jul. 28, 2000  Drug-Policy Debate
Nov. 20, 1998  Drug Testing
Jan. 06, 1995  Treating Addiction
Mar. 19, 1993  War on Drugs
Feb. 23, 1990  Does the War on Drugs Need a New Strategy?
May 20, 1988  The Business of Illicit Drugs
Jan. 23, 1987  Experimental Drugs
Feb. 08, 1985  The Fight Against Drug Smuggling
Aug. 27, 1982  Cocaine: Drug of the Eighties
Jun. 11, 1982  Prescription-Drug Abuse
Jan. 23, 1976  Changing U.S. Drug Policy
Dec. 13, 1972  World Drug Traffic
May 27, 1970  Heroin Addiction
Jan. 27, 1965  Psychotoxic Drugs
Jul. 18, 1962  Narcotics Addiction: Punishment or Treatment
Sep. 05, 1956  Control of Drug Addiction
Mar. 28, 1951  Drug Addiction
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Drug Abuse
Substance Abuse