Prostitution

June 11, 1993 • Volume 3, Issue 22
Will neighborhood crackdowns curb the sex trade?
By Charles S. Clark

Introduction

Urban police departments have added a new twist to the centuries-old conflict over the sex trade: They are seizing the cars of men caught soliciting prostitutes. These unprecedented efforts to target the demand side of this ancient phenomenon were mounted in response to vocal citizens groups. They complain that street prostitution brings noise, declining property values, a bad environment for children and a health threat evidenced by the used condoms and drug paraphernalia littering city sidewalks. Civil libertarians call the tactic unconstitutional, but in the AIDS era the issue takes on a special urgency. Meanwhile, old debates over decriminalizing prostitution have been rekindled, and women's groups are sparring over the fundamental ethical question of whether men and women should be allowed to sell their bodies.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Sexual Behavior
Apr. 28, 2017  Sports and Sexual Assault
Oct. 21, 2016  Pornography
Apr. 15, 2016  Decriminalizing Prostitution
Oct. 31, 2014  Campus Sexual Assault
Apr. 27, 2012  Sexual Harassment
Jan. 22, 2010  Sex Scandals
May 23, 2008  Prostitution Debate
Nov. 04, 1994  Sex on Campus
Jun. 11, 1993  Prostitution
Jul. 13, 1984  Sexual Revolution Reconsidered
Aug. 25, 1971  Legalization of Prostitution
Apr. 01, 1970  Sexual Revolution: Myth or Reality
Dec. 30, 1963  Sex on the Campus
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Crime and Law Enforcement
HIV and AIDS