Should the U.S. Reinstate the Draft?

January 11, 1991 • Volume 1
By Patrick G. Marshall


Since 1973, when the United States abandoned military conscription in favor of an all-volunteer force, many people have come to regard military service as more of a job opportunity than a patriotic duty. But the threat of war in the Persian Gulf has changed things dramatically. With lives on the line, critics have charged that the all-volunteer forces put minorities and the poor disproportionately at risk. They say the United States should return to the draft to ensure that the sacrifices of war are more evenly shared.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Military Draft
Aug. 19, 2005  Draft Debates
Jan. 11, 1991  Should the U.S. Reinstate the Draft?
Jun. 13, 1980  Draft Registration
Jun. 20, 1975  Volunteer Army
Nov. 17, 1971  Rebuilding the Army
Nov. 18, 1970  Expatriate Americans
Mar. 20, 1968  Resistance to Military Service
Jun. 22, 1966  Draft Law Revision
Jan. 20, 1965  Reserve Forces and the Draft
Feb. 14, 1962  Military Manpower Policies
Jun. 03, 1954  Military Manpower
Sep. 24, 1952  National Health and Manpower Resources
Oct. 24, 1950  Training for War Service
Aug. 21, 1950  Manpower Controls
Aug. 13, 1945  Peacetime Conscription
Sep. 09, 1944  The Voting Age
Apr. 15, 1944  Universal Military Service
Feb. 17, 1942  Compulsory Labor Service
Jun. 11, 1941  Revision of the Draft System
Aug. 14, 1940  Conscription in the United States
Apr. 24, 1939  Conscription for Military Service
Military Draft