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Economic Relations with Latin America

July 2, 1958

Report Outline
Latin Economic Ilis and U.S. Policies
Course of Economic Relations Since 1933
Requirements for Economic Development
Special Focus

Latin Economic Ilis and U.S. Policies

Review of policies tiwards latin america

Pressure is building up in Latin America for a review and reordering of relations, particularly economic relations, among the Western Hemisphere republics. The President of Brazil, Juscelino Kubitschek, took the problem up a month ago in a letter to President Eisenhower; more recently, in a broadcast address at Rio de Janeiro on June 20, Kubitschek called for an inter-American conference “on the highest political level of the continent” to seek remedies for the “disease of underdevelopment.”

Whether a conference of the presidents of the 21 American republics actually will be convened probably will be clarified when Secretary of State Dulles makes a scheduled visit to Brazil in the first week of August. A lower-level parley may be considered a more effective forum for attacking the complex economic problems in question. Whatever the medium, it is becoming plain that United States participation in a curative effort in Latin American countries beset by chronic economic ills is essential to improvement of over-all relations in the hemisphere community.

The violent mob attack to which Vice President Nixon was subjected in Caracas, Venezuela, on May 13 shocked the people of the United States into awareness of the fact that something had gone radically wrong in inter-American relations. Nixon himself, though blaming “Communist bullies” for engineering the outbreak, was the first to say that “We need a reappraisal of our policies so that we can counteract what has been a very insidious effect of the Soviet propaganda and subversive offensive.” The Vice President said on his return home, May 15, that “The problem in South America is accentuated by economic factors—like the fall in the prices of coffee, tin, wool-tops, lead, zinc and copper—which have increased the difficulties for the moment.”

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Latin America
Jun. 05, 2012  China in Latin America
Mar. 2008  The New Latin America
Jul. 21, 2006  Change in Latin America
Mar. 14, 2003  Trouble in South America
Nov. 09, 2001  U.S.- Mexico Relations
Sep. 19, 1997  Mexico's Future
Jul. 19, 1991  Mexico's Emergence
May 05, 1989  New Approach to Central America
Mar. 06, 1987  Soviets' Latin Influence
Dec. 26, 1986  Pinochet's Chile
Nov. 08, 1985  Troubled Mexico
Apr. 10, 1981  Latin American Challenges
May 05, 1978  Central America and the U.S.A.
Sep. 23, 1977  Mexican-U.S. Relations
Jun. 04, 1976  Relations with Latin America
Oct. 21, 1970  Chile's Embattled Democracy
Jun. 24, 1970  Mexico's Election and the Continuing Revolution
Apr. 02, 1969  Economic Nationalism in Latin America
Jul. 19, 1967  Guerrilla Movements in Latin America
Dec. 28, 1966  Militarism in Latin America
Oct. 20, 1965  Common Market for Latin America
Aug. 04, 1965  Smoldering Colombia
Jun. 23, 1965  Inter-American Peacekeeping
Dec. 11, 1963  Progress of the Alianza
Oct. 05, 1962  Arms Aid to Latin America
Dec. 13, 1961  Land and Tax Reform in Latin America
Jul. 26, 1961  Commodity Agreements for Latin America
Jan. 11, 1961  Revolution in the Western Hemisphere
Feb. 10, 1960  Inter-American System
Jan. 13, 1960  Expropriation in Latin America
Jul. 02, 1958  Economic Relations with Latin America
Mar. 02, 1954  Communism in Latin America
Jun. 20, 1952  Political Unrest in Latin America
Sep. 18, 1950  War Aid from Latin America
Oct. 31, 1947  Arming the Americas
Jul. 24, 1946  Inter-American Security
Jan. 02, 1942  Latin America and the War
Jul. 10, 1941  Export Surpluses and Import Needs of South America
Jun. 04, 1941  Economic Defense of Latin America
Jun. 25, 1940  Politics in Mexico
Nov. 01, 1939  Pan American Political Relations
Oct. 10, 1939  United States Trade with Latin America
Apr. 07, 1938  Protection of American Interests in Mexico
Mar. 04, 1936  Peace Machinery in the Americas
Sep. 27, 1933  Trade Relations with Latin America
Oct. 16, 1928  Pan American Arbitration Conference
Jan. 12, 1928  The Sixth Pan American Conference
Jan. 10, 1927  American Policy in Nicaragua
Dec. 27, 1926  Relations Between Mexico and the United States
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Bilateral and Regional Trade
International Economic Development
Regional Political Affairs: Latin America and the Caribbean
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