Labor Relations in the Steel Industry

July 14, 1936

Report Outline
Impending Labor Conflicts in Steel
Union Organizers vs. Steel Corporation
The Overthrow of Trade Unionism in Steel
The Great Steel Strike of 1919
Company Unions in the Steel Industry

Impending Labor Conflicts in Steel

Announced Objectives of the Opposing Forces

A trade union organizing campaign, expected to lead to a strike in the basic iron and steel industry before the end of the year, was begun July 1 by the newly-formed Committee for Industrial Organization, headed by John L. Lewis, president of the United Mine Workers of America. The degree of success which attends this effort to compel corporations in the steel industry to share control of wages, hours, and working conditions in their plants with outside trade unions may profoundly influence the future form of labor organization in the United States. The issue presented by the organizing campaign, as formulated at the outset, is whether the steel companies shall in future deal collectively with their employees through their own plant unions or through an industrial union organized on a national scale and representing all workers in the industry.

In anticipation of the organizing campaign, the American Iron and Steel Institute, representing 95 per cent of the productive capacity of the industry, issued a statement of its position, June 28, which was reproduced in part in advertisements in some 375 newspapers on July 1. The advertisement was addressed to “the public and the employees in the steel industry.” It said there were many disturbing indications that the promoters of the organizing drive would employ coercion and intimidation, and would foment strikes.

The objective of the campaign is the “closed shop,” which prohibits the employment, of anyone not a union member. The steel industry will oppose any attempt to compel its employees to join a union or to pay tribute for the right to work.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
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Jun. 14, 1985  Organized Labor in the 1980s
Nov. 06, 1981  Labor Under Siege
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Aug. 20, 1976  Labor's Options
Oct. 27, 1971  Organized Labor After the Freeze
Oct. 19, 1966  Labor Strife and the Public Interest
Jan. 30, 1963  Strike Action and the Law
Sep. 20, 1961  Conflicts in Organized Labor
Aug. 04, 1960  Labor, Management, and the National Interest
Dec. 16, 1959  Future of Free Collective Bargaining
Nov. 04, 1959  Featherbedding and Union Work Rules
Feb. 18, 1959  Public Intervention in Labor Disputes
Jul. 09, 1958  Suits Against Labor Unions
Nov. 13, 1957  Right-To-Work Laws
Oct. 31, 1956  Union Organizing
May 01, 1954  State Powers in Labor Relations
Oct. 02, 1953  Toward Labor Unity
Apr. 11, 1953  Industry-Wide Bargaining and Industry-Wide Strikes
Sep. 03, 1952  Labor and Politics
Mar. 25, 1950  Labor Injunctions
Jan. 25, 1950  Trade Unions and Productivity
Sep. 26, 1949  Fact-Finding Boards in Labor Disputes
Mar. 05, 1949  Closed Shop
Dec. 01, 1948  Revision of the Taft-Hartley Act
Jan. 01, 1947  Labor Unions, the Public and the Law
Oct. 09, 1946  Revision of the Wagner Act
Sep. 25, 1946  Labor Productivity
May 29, 1946  Labor Organization in the South
Jan. 30, 1946  Compulsory Settlement of Labor Disputes
May 18, 1945  Labor Policy After the War
Mar. 29, 1945  Union Maintenance
Feb. 02, 1945  Labor Relations in Coal Mining
Oct. 12, 1944  No-Strike Pledge
Sep. 16, 1944  Political Action by Organized Labor
May 30, 1944  Unionization of Foremen
Apr. 01, 1944  Dismissal Pay
Apr. 29, 1943  Labor in Government
Apr. 09, 1943  Public Regulation of Trade Unions
Nov. 19, 1941  Labor Policies of the Roosevelt Administration
Oct. 23, 1941  Closed Shop Issue in Labor Relations
Mar. 29, 1941  Labor as Partner in Production
Feb. 12, 1941  Labor and the Defense Program
Feb. 23, 1940  Labor in Politics
Jan. 17, 1939  Settlement of Disputes Between Labor Unions
Jul. 01, 1938  Three Years of National Labor Relations Act
Nov. 12, 1937  State Regulation of Labor Relations
Jul. 10, 1937  Restrictions on the Right to Strike
Apr. 28, 1937  The Labor Market and the Unemployed
Mar. 26, 1937  Control of the Sit-Down Strike
Mar. 13, 1937  Collective Bargaining in the Soft-Coal Industry
Jan. 22, 1937  Responsibility of Labor Unions
Nov. 11, 1936  Industrial Unionism and the A.F. of L.
Jul. 30, 1936  Federal Intervention in Labor Disputes
Jul. 14, 1936  Labor Relations in the Steel Industry
Apr. 17, 1934  Company Unions and Collective Bargaining
Feb. 07, 1934  Settlement of Labor Disputes
Sep. 12, 1933  Trade Unionism Under the Recovery Program
Feb. 17, 1932  Wage Concessions by Trade Unions
Oct. 01, 1929  Status of the American Labor Movement
Jul. 20, 1929  Trade Unionism in the South
Aug. 31, 1928  Organized Labor in National Politics
Feb. 04, 1928  The Use of Injunctions in Labor Disputes
Sep. 09, 1927  Organized Labor and the Works Council Movement
Oct. 12, 1923  The A.F. of L. and the “New Radicalism”
Manufacturing and Industrial Production
Unions and Labor-Management Relations