Foreign and Domestic Tourist Traffic

June 17, 1930

Report Outline
Volume of Foreign Tourist Traffic
Expenditures of American Tourists Overseas
American Tourists in Neighboring Countries
American Tourists at Home
Travel by Rail, Motor Coach, Water, and Air
Efforts to Expand Domestic Tourist Trade
Foreign Tourist Expenditures in United States
Special Focus

Volume of Foreign Tourist Traffic

Foreign Departures; Passports Issued, 1925–29

The annual return of the vacation season finds Americans again a wheel and afloat at home and abroad. Like the two gentlemen of Verona who “went forth to see the wonders of the world instead of remaining dully sluggarded at home,” millions of Americans are planning tours, short and long, during the 1930 holiday season that will take them to all parts of the United States and to many foreign lands. These tours and the expenditures made by the tourists will have an important influence upon the balance of international trade and will create a huge volume of business for the agencies and interests that thrive upon the domestic tourist traffic. It is predicted that a larger number of persons will travel at home and abroad in 1930 and will spend more money than in any previous year. This report will present such evidence as is available upon the extent and character of the American tourist traffic and the volume of expenditure it entails.

Volume of Foreign Tourist Traffic

The number of American citizens leaving the United States for foreign lands is reported annually by the Bureau of Immigration, Department of Labor, and the number of passports issued is reported by the Department of State.

Year Foreign departures of American citizens Passports issued to American citizens
1925 356,155 172,209
1926 367,739 176,033
1927 405,989 182,425
1928 451,972 189,308
1929 452,658 196,930

It will be seen that during the last five years “foreign departures of American citizens” have increased by nearly 100,000 (27.1 per cent) and that the number of passports issued to American citizens for foreign travel was nearly 25,000 (14.3 per cent) larger in 1929 than in 1925.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Tourism and Vacation
Oct. 20, 2006  Ecotourism
Jun. 17, 1988  America's ‘Vacation Gap’
May 04, 1984  Tourism's Economic Impact
Jul. 21, 1978  Tourism Boom
May 14, 1969  Summer Camps and Student Travel
May 18, 1966  Tourist Dollar Gap
Apr. 19, 1961  Two-Way Tourism
Jul. 20, 1955  Competition for Passenger Travel
Jul. 03, 1946  Travel Boom
Jun. 17, 1930  Foreign and Domestic Tourist Traffic
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Travel and Tourism