The Rise of New Industries in the United States

August 27, 1927

Report Outline
Shifts in Production and Consumption
Growth of Automobile and Related Industries
The Electrical Equipment Industries
Shifts in Production of Machinery
Changes in Products for Consumption
Future Development of Industry

During the first twenty five years of the present century the quantity of goods, commodities and services produced in the United States increased by about 140 per cent. Population in the same period increased by only 54 per cent. Production in 1925 for each man, woman and child in the country, therefore, was nearly 60 per cent larger than a quarter century before. These developments are shown by the following figures compiled by the Department of Commerce.

Table 1. Quarter Century Increase in Production
  Percent of increase 1899 to 1925
Agriculture 47
Mining 348
Manufacture 175
Transportation (railway) 199
Total 140
Population increase 54%. Increase in output per capita 56%.

The foregoing estimates of the increase in production do not include construction of various sorts, communication or facilities for amusement, recreation and diversion. It is probable that these omitted phases of human endeavor particularly the last three have grown even more rapidly than those covered by the table. The estimate of 56 per cent as the increase in the output per capita, therefore, is probably an understatement of the case.

The figures given in Table 1 show wide differences in the growth of production in the four main branches of industry. The output of agricultural products has fallen short of keeping pace with the growth of the population, while the production of minerals has shown a remarkably rapid expansion and that of manufactures has increased much more rapidly than population. Investigation of different products of mining and manufacture will show that within these main groups there have been further wide differences in rates of expansion.

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BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Economic Analyses, Forecasts, and Statistics
Manufacturing and Industrial Production
Railroads